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Sep 12 2014

Which vacuum attachment tool for which surface?

Vacuum cleaners usually come with several different kinds of attachments. But if you’re like me, you usually stick to one or two attachments and the rest get stored away. However learning what each attachment does can maximize your vacuum’s efficiency and get you the deepest clean.

Beater Bar Attachment

The beater bar attachment is my favorite vacuum attachment. It is the head on most upright vacuums. It is also called a power or turbo brush. It’s known as the beater bar attachment because it has a beater bar or brush roller. It’s your basic all around tool. The beater bar stirs up dust and debris from the surface, while the suction picks it up. It’s the best for carpets.

Crevice Tool

The Crevice tool is my second favorite vacuum attachment. It gets in between tight areas and my ceiling. I even clean my laptop’s keyboard with it especially with the mini micro attachment tool kit. It fits perfectly under the refrigerator and extracts all the dust from my A.C.

 

 

Dusting Brush

The dusting brush tool is one that spends the most time stored away. However when utilized probably, it is the best tool for delicate cleaning. Your window blinds, mirrors, lampshades, windowsills, fine china, art and even your family dog or cat can be vacuumed using the dusting brush attachment. Ceiling fan blades no longer require their own separate attachment. And on a lower suction setting, you can even vacuum your house plants.

 

Upholstery Tool

The upholstery tool usually has red velour strips to pick up dust and debris. It’s small size allows it to easily detail furniture and mattresses. You can also gently clean clothing and outerwear including wool, and fur coats.

 

 

 

Floor Nozzle

The rug and floor nozzle attachment has no beater brush. Since it does not have a beater brush, it solely relies on suction. It is smooth underneath making it best for delicate carpets, low piled carpets and hard surfaces.

 

 

 

Floor Brush

The floor brush attachment tool is best for wood floors. The bristles under the brush are shaped in rectangular openings, like Jack O’ Lantern’s teeth, to prevent scratches. You can also use them on brick, stone and tile floors.

 

 

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